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bad breath after brushing

What Causes Bad Breath Even After Brushing?

With an estimated 80 million people experiencing bad breath on a regular basis, there’s a lot of myths that abound about why your mouth becomes so odorous. Understanding the true causes of recurring bad breath, especially a smell that lingers after brushing, is the only way to tackle the problem truly. Get your breath smelling better without expensive rinses and mints by finding the cause.

Sinus Infections

A low grade and chronic sinus infection are one of the most surprising and common causes of serious bad breath. Even a little infection lingering in the cavernous spaces behind your nose, eyes, and mouth can result in a very offensive odor. You may have little to no outward symptoms, or confuse your sniffles and stuffiness for allergies, allowing the infection to worsen over time. A dentist can help you determine if this is the reason your bad breath is unabated by brushing.

Lack of Flossing

You brush twice a day, but do you remember to floss every day? It can be a little uncomfortable, but finding a method that is comfortable for you is necessary for fresh breath. Brushing leaves behind food particles that rot and feed bacteria, leading to stink producing colonies hidden between the teeth where the brush can’t touch them. Choose a flossing method you can live with if you want to enjoy fresh breath throughout the day.

Halitosis

For some people, bad breath is a hereditary condition that requires regular treatment from their dentist. The term halitosis refers to bad breath in general, but as a diagnosis, it is considered its own condition. Some people experience chronic halitosis because they make an insufficient amount of saliva. They may not feel like their mouth is dry, but a lack of saliva allows bacteria levels to rise. This results in the bad breath that doesn’t respond to over the counter treatments and threatens the health of your teeth and gums as well.

Coffee Drinking

Too many people overlook their coffee and smoking habits when wondering why they’re experiencing chronic bad breath. Even if you routine brush or rinse your mouth after every espresso or cigarette break, the long term effects of smoke inhalation and high acid content contribute to halitosis regardless. Breaking these habits, or at least switching them for healthier alternatives, will reward you with better breath all day long in addition to the rest of the health benefits.

Plaque Deposits

Skipping your routine cleaning visits at the dentist does more than just raise your risk of getting a cavity. Going too long between cleanings allows tartar to harden into plaque. Plaque is an ideal host for the bacteria that produce the sulfur compounds that make other people find your breath unpleasant. Routine cleanings remove the plaque, so your brushing efforts work to sweep out the bacteria gathering at the gum lines. As a result, you’ll also help avoid gingivitis and advanced gum disease. Resistant bad breath is one of the earliest signs of gum disease, so visit your dentist for a checkup any time you notice an odor returning as soon as you’re done brushing your teeth.