Dupont Dental - Your Washington DC Dentist


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All Posts in Category: Flossing

How to get food stuck in your dental implants out

How to Get Food Stuck in Your Dental Implants Out

Dental implants can be a boon for patients who are missing a tooth here or there but who otherwise have a healthy oral structure. One of the most unpleasant things that can happen after they are installed, though, is having food get stuck in them. Not only does this look unsightly, but the food can also cause discomfort for you. Below, the Dupont Dental team shares a few tips for dealing with this common problem.

Using an Oral Irrigator

While taking care of your dental implants shouldn’t be any more difficult than taking care of your natural teeth, there are ways to make it easier. Flossing regularly is one reason, but doing so does have its limitations. For example, to be effective at flossing, you need to have the manual dexterity to maneuver the dental floss to get food out of all the hard to reach places in your mouth.

Another drawback to flossing is that you might not know the proper technique to use, so you skip it altogether. Flossing is also limited in the area that can be reached. Using an oral irrigator can help remove food debris that’s under your dental implant and provide instant relief.

Oral Irrigator Basics

It’s likely that you’ve heard of an oral irrigator though you might know it by another name. A “water pik,” “water flosser” and “hydroflosser” are all names of an oral irrigator. Most models have a reservoir that is filled with water. A hose is then directed at different areas of your mouth, and the water from the reservoir is squirted inside.

It’s important to charge up the oral irrigator before using it to get the full effect from it. A relatively inexpensive dental tool, an oral irrigator is an effective way for patients with dental devices, such as dental implants and braces, to keep their teeth clean and free of food debris. Many models feature different levels of pressure so that the user can customize it to suit their needs and preferences. Also, there is often a feature that allows you to pause the pulsing of the water so that you can switch the location of the stream of water or angle it better.

For most people, finding an oral irrigator is quick and easy. Available in many drug, grocery and department stores, prices range from around $30 and up with some models costing as much as $100. For most purposes, though, a model in the middle price range — around $60 — will be sufficient for your use.

Reasons for Keeping Your Dental Implants Clean

As we mentioned previously, there is the perception that it can be difficult to keep dental implants clean. In fact, many patients can find the process intimidating, and they might even avoid it altogether. The reality is that keeping your dental implants clean is no more difficult than keeping your natural teeth clean. The reasons for doing so are also much the same as well.

While the fact that food collects around your dental implants is not an uncommon occurrence, some people may experience more difficulty than others. Another possibility is that you might experience more issues with food getting stuck in one implant but not another. One reason for this difference could be because of the natural way that your teeth fit together in your mouth.

If food gets stuck to your dental implants or near the gumline, it could cause your gum to become inflamed and red. If they aren’t removed promptly, this food can lead to your gums becoming infected due to an increase in the bacteria. Not only does the collected food introduce bacteria of its own, but it can also lead to an increase in the number of bacteria that your dental implant is exposed to. This can overwhelm your body’s defenses and quickly lead to an infection.

Food that is stuck between your dental implants and your gums can also lead to impaction. This potentially more serious condition generally occurs when food debris or particles are forcefully wedged in those spaces. You’ll usually notice more inflammation and pain if there is food impacted. Also, when you bite onto the dental implant that’s affected, you’ll experience more pain. Even worse, the food will continue to be forced more firmly into the space.

What Should You Do if You Have Food Stuck in Your Dental Implant?

If you have food stuck in your dental implant and you aren’t able to remove it using dental floss, toothbrushing or an oral irrigator, it’s time for you to seek out professional care. If you are experiencing pain, inflammation and/or redness in the gum area surrounding your dental implant, this also warrants a visit to your dentist. It’s important not to put off making an appointment with your dentist if you are having this kind of issue with your dental implant. Also, if you are experiencing any kind of pain, discomfort or change in how the dental implant feels, you need to make an appointment with your dentist as soon as possible.

Like most other health issues, pain, inflammation, and swelling in the area near your dental implant is a condition that will only worsen over time. Quick intervention by your dental professional can not only relieve you of your pain and discomfort; it can help prevent the failure of your dental implant.

At Dupont Dental, your comfort and health is our top priority. We work closely with you to determine the best options for oral health to meet your needs. We encourage you to keep all your scheduled appointments so we can find and address any issues that might arise before they get worse. Contact us today if you need any assistance with your dental implants or if you have any other dental health issues.

 

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organic dentist

The Perfect Dental Routine for the Organic Patient

In addition to regular dental visits, a solid brushing and flossing routine is vital to good oral hygiene. Most people reach for a tube of minty fresh toothpaste, ready to check off their morning and night duties. However, a closer inspection of the ingredient reveals its not-so-great contents. With ingredients like carrageenan, artificial colors, and sodium lauryl sulfate, an organic patient might wonder how to balance a healthy dental routine without compromising on the ingredient list. Following these tips can ensure the perfect dental routine for the organic patient.

Brushing

Brushing is more than the product used. The effectiveness of brushing relies heavily on the technique; brush for two to three minutes while making sure to cover all surface areas of the teeth, gums, and tongue. As for the cleaning product, there are two options:

  • Powder: Tooth powder is less common than toothpaste but equally effective. Often made of baking soda, salt, and sometimes essential oils, tooth powders are extremely easy to make as well as inexpensive.
  • Paste: While toothpaste can be homemade, there are many organic and natural toothpastes available to purchase. Look for toothpastes that are all-natural and avoid ingredients such as artificial flavors and dyes.

Avoid products with the following ingredients: sodium laurel sulfate, artificial dyes and flavors, triclosan, propylene glycol, and microbeads.

Flossing

Healthy gums and fresh breath are dependent upon good flossing. However, not all floss is created equally; conventional flosses may be coated with synthetic waxes and flavored with artificial flavors and sweeteners. When choosing a new floss, opt for floss with:

  • Vegan wax: Flosses, such as TheraNeem floss, are coated with a vegan wax.
  • Neem extract: Also a vegan wax, many flosses also include neem extract in the coating. Why does it matter what ingredients are in the floss? Floss does more than just remove food from hard-to-reach places. Floss removes plaque and debris and helps prevent inflamed gums. In fact, as the floss slides between teeth, neem extract helps to reduce gum inflammation.
  • Tea tree oil: Like neem extract and clove oil, tea tree oil is a powerful ingredient in organic oral care products. Tea tree oil reduces gum bleeding as well as gingivitis.

Rinsing and freshening breath

The grand finale of an oral routine is to rinse, usually with mouthwash. Like toothpaste, many conventional types of mouthwash contain questionable ingredients including artificial flavors and colors. Naturally, derived mouthwash is harder to find, but it is possible. Other options for freshening breath include:

  • Tongue scraping: Tongue scraping freshens breath by removing bacteria and food particles from the surface of the tongue. There are special tongue scrapers available, but some toothbrushes even have a special bristle on the brush head to carry out this task.
  • Oil pulling: While it might seem counterproductive to rinse with oil, oil pulling is an ancient practice that is gaining popularity. Place a piece of coconut oil in your mouth. As the coconut oil melts, swish in for at least 30 seconds. Oil pulling draws toxins out of your mouth, which creates a fresher, cleaner mouth.

No matter what products that fill the medicine cabinet, good oral health depends on a consistent routine of brushing, flossing, and rinsing. If, at any time, you have any concerns regarding organic oral care products, speak with your dentist.

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why is it important to floss

Flossing: Why It Is So Important?

Every time you visit the dentist, you are likely told how important it is to floss regularly. This helpful tip is a great reminder for your oral hygiene, but a lot of people fail to take care of this small part. Even though it does not take long, it can make a big difference.

What is the Purpose of Flossing?

Flossing is a way to clean between your teeth. As much as people wish it were true, brushing only cleans the surface of your teeth. Brushing cannot get into the crevices of your teeth and clean out the food particles that are stuck between them. Many types of bacteria build up in these spaces that cannot be removed without proper flossing. Even if you think that brushing gets these things out of your teeth, the fact remains that it cannot remove everything and you will still have food particles and bacteria between your teeth.

What Happens When You Do Not Floss?

When you do not floss, you start getting plaque buildup between your teeth. This plaque buildup can be removed mostly by your dentist, but if you only visit the dentist twice per year as recommended, you will have a lot of plaque buildup that is on your teeth for a good part of every year. This plaque buildup can lead to other problems with your teeth such as cavities, tooth decay, and even gum disease. Not only can these things be very costly to repair, but some of them may also be irreversible.

How Often Should You Floss?

It is recommended that you floss at least one time per day according to the American Dental Association. You should make it a part of your daily routine and get in the habit of doing it at the same time each day. Many experts say that flossing at night before bed is the best time so you can clean out all of the bacteria before bed. Additionally, it is important that you take your time flossing to ensure you are doing it correctly and efficiently cleaning between your teeth. If you complete it too fast or do it the wrong way, you are likely to miss some of the things you need to clean.

Brushing is More Effective When Paired with Flossing

You should not perform one or the other when taking care of your dental hygiene at night. Make sure you both brush and floss to get a proper clean. You can even follow it up with some mouthwash. However, mouthwash should never be used instead of brushing or flossing for your nightly routine. The American Dental Association recommends that you floss before brushing so you can get a better clean.

Flossing Can Provide Better Breath

If you are not convinced yet that flossing is vital for your oral care, one last benefit of flossing is that you can achieve better breath after brushing and flossing together than if you were just to brush. The reason for this is because sometimes bad breath can be caused by food or bacteria between your teeth. Even after brushing, if this is still in your mouth, you are still likely to have bad breath once the toothpaste smell goes away. It can even help with the oral discomfort that comes from food being in between teeth.

Flossing is a critical part of maintaining oral health, and it has benefits that are separate from brushing alone. Your dentist knows best on this one, and you should make it a part of your daily oral care routine.

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daily oral health tips

Everyday Oral Health Tips

Are you keeping your mouth healthy and clean? Most people neglect at least a few areas of the mouth that need to be kept clean. That might be the spaces between the teeth, the gum line or the tongue. This leads to the development of problems that can be painful, embarrassing or uncomfortable.

Luckily, with these simple tips, you’ll be able to keep your mouth healthy and avoid any of the common issues.

Brush Regularly And Thoroughly

You should be brushing your teeth twice a day and spent two minutes each time at least. Some people go overboard and brush after every meal. This isn’t necessary unless you have a brace in which case, it might be. That’s only because food tends to get trapped and stuck in the brackets. For the rest of us, twice a day is enough with thirty seconds spent in each corner of the mouth. When you’re brushing, let the toothbrush move naturally. Make sure you are brushing close to the gumline as this is where plaque builds. Remember, you should keep your brush at a forty-five degrees angle and not spit until the end. Keeping the liquid washing around your mouth for longer will lead to a better clean.

Don’t Forget To Floss

You should floss after every meal and possibly each time that you eat. Wrap the floss around two of your fingers and move it between your teeth in a backward, forwards, motion. Be sure to clean until you don’t feel any resistance, but don’t pull too hard. This could damage your gum line. The first time you floss might result in bleeding, and while frightening, this is perfectly reasonable. It means it’s doing the job.

Use Mouthwash

You should be using mouthwash after you brush your teeth. Look for a mouthwash that contains fluoride as this is the best chemical for cleaning your teeth. You need to hold the mouthwash in for no longer than a minute and make sure that you don’t swallow. In large quantities, fluoride can be dangerous and have long lasting effects. You can use mouthwash daily as long as you are spitting it out each time.

Clean Your Tongue

Make sure that you’re cleaning as much of the tongue as you can. You can use floss, the toothbrush or the back of the brush to do this. Some toothbrushes do have a special rubber surface on the back, specifically for cleaning the tongue. Don’t neglect to clean your tongue as a dirty tongue can result in the development of bad breath.

Keep A Healthy Diet

Finally, you should think about your diet. What you eat can affect your oral health, particularly, if you consistently eat meals high in sugar. Even regularly cleaning your teeth won’t prevent the development of damage such as tooth decay. Try to avoid drinking large amounts of fizzy drinks each day. If you do have a sweet tooth, limit yourself to one and make sure you use a straw. This will help most of the sugar go past the teeth and straight down the throat.

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